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Fire Ecology

Fire Effects Research and Demonstration Sites

Fire Effects Research and Demonstration Sites

Oklahoma

oklahoma map2

1. Fire Frequency in Oak-Pine Forest          PICTURES

Pushmataha Wildlife Management Area

Location: Pushmataha County, 2 miles east and 3 miles south of Clayton, OK

Land Owner: Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation

Date Initiated: 1982

Plots: 28 plots, 3-11 acres in size

Treatments: 

  • Control (no burn, no harvest, no thin)
  • Rough Reduction - burn every 4 years
  • Harvest Pine Thin Hardwoods - burn every 4 years
  • Harvest Pine Thin Hardwoods - burn every 3 years
  • Harvest Pine Thin Hardwoods - burn every 2 years
  • Harvest Pine Thin Hardwoods - burn every year
  • Harvest Pine Thin Hardwoods - no burn
  • Harvest Pine No Thinning of Hardwoods - burn every year
  • Thin Hardwoods - burn every year
  • Clear - cut and site preparation

Publications from area:

  • Crandall, R.M. 2003. Vegetation of the Pushmataha Wildlife Management Area, Pushmataha County, Oklahoma. M.S. Thesis. Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma. 114 p. 
  • Masters, R.E. 1991. Effects of timber harvest and prescribed fire on wildlife habitat and use in the Ouachita Mountains of eastern Oklahoma. Ph.D. Thesis. Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma. 351 p.
  • Masters, R.E. 1991. Effects of fire and timber harvest on vegetation and cervid use on oak-pine sites in Oklahoma Ouachita Mountains. Pages 168-176. In S.C. Nodvin and T.A. Waldrop, (eds.). Fire and the environment: ecological and cultural perspectives. Proc. of an international symposium. USDA For. Serv. Gen. Tech. Rep. SE-69. Southeast For. Exp. Sta., Ashevill, N.C. 
  • Masters, R.E., D.M. Engle and R. Robinson. 1993. Effects of timber harvest and periodic fire on soil chemical properties in the Ouachita Mountains. South. J. Appl. For. 17:139-145
  • Masters, R.E., R.L. Lochmiller and D.M. Engle. 1993. Effects of timber harvest and periodic fire on white-tailed deer forage production. Wildl. Soc. Bull. 21:401-411
  • Masters, R.E., and D.M. Engle. 1994. BEHAVE-evaluated for prescribed fire planning in mountainous oak-shortleaf pine habitats. Wildl. Soc. Bull. 22:184-191
  • Masters, R.E., W.D. Warde, and R.L. Lochmiller. 1997. Herbivore response to alternative forest management practices. Proc. Annu. Conf. Southeast. Assoc. Fish and Wildl. Agencies 51:225-237
  • Masters, R.E. 2007. Shortleaf pine fire ecology and management. Southern Fire Encyclopedia, web publication. IN PRESS
  • Masters, R.E. 2007. The importance of shortleaf pine for wildlife and diversity in mixed oak-pine forests and in pine-grassland woodlands. In: Proceeding of a Conference: Shortleaf Pine Ecology and Management. November 6-9, 2006. Springfield, MO. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Forest Experiment Station. General Technical Report-NE-xx IN PRESS
  • Masters, R. E. 2007.  The importance of shortleaf pine for wildlife and diversity in mixed oak-pine forests and in pine-grassland woodlands.  In: Kabrick, John M.; Dey, Daniel C.; Gwaze, David, eds. Shortleaf pine restoration and ecology in the Ozarks: proceedings of a symposium; 2006 November 7-9; Springfield, MO. Gen. Tech. Rep. NRS-P-15. Newtown Square, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Northern Research Station: 35-46

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2. Fire Frequency in Sand Shinnery Oak Grassland            PICTURES

Black Kettle National Grassland

Location: Roger Mills County

  • Unit 41: 4 miles north and 1 mile east of Reydon, OK
  • Unit 1: 12 miles north and 5 miles west of Cheyenne, OK
  • Packsaddle Wildlife Management Area, Ellis County: 17 miles south and 2 miles east of Arnett, OK

Land Owner: US Forest Service and Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation

Date Initiated: 1995

Plots: each site has 12, 30m x 60m plots

Treatments:

  • Control (no burn)
  • Burn fall every 2 years
  • Burn fall every 5 years
  • Burn winter every 2 years
  • Burn winter every 5 years
  • Burn spring every 2 years
  • Burn spring every 5 years

Publications from area:

  • Boyd, C.S. 1999. The effects of burning season and frequency on the vegetative characteristics and insect abundance of Sand Shinnery Oak range in western Oklahoma. PhD. Dissertation, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK.
  • Boyd, C.S. and T.G. Bidwell. 2002. Effects of prescribed fire on shinnery oak (Quercus havardii) plant communities in western Oklahoma. Restoration Ecology 10:324-333
  • Boyd, C.S., and T.G. Bidwell. 2001. Influence of prescribed fire on lesser prairie-chicken habitat in shinnery oak communities in western Oklahoma. Wildlife Society Bulletin 29:938-947
  • Boyd, C.S., L.T. Vermeire, T.G. Bidwell, and R.L. Lochmiller. 2001. Nutritional quality of shinnery oak buds and catkins in response to burning or herbivory. Southwestern Naturalist 46:295-301
  • Harrell, W.C., S.D. Fuhlendorf, and T.G. Bidwell. 2001. Effects of prescribed fire on sand shinnery oal communities. Journal of Range Management 54:685-690
  • Peterson, R.S. and C.S. Boyd. 1998. Ecology and management of sand shinnery oak communities: A literature review. U.S. Forest Service GTR-16. Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station. Fort Collins, CO.

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3. Fire Frequency in Post Oak Oak-Blackjack Oak Forest       PICTURES

Tallgrass Prairie Preserve

Location: Osage County, 8 miles north of Pawhuska, OK

Land Owner: The Nature Conservancy

Date Initiated: 1993

Plots: 3-20 acres, 50 acres, 70 acres 

Treatments: 

  • Control - no burn
  • Spring burn every 3 years
  • Summer burn every 3 years

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4. Season of Burn in Tallgrass Prairie                PICTURES

OSU Research Range

Location: Payne County, 7 miles west and 2.5 miles south of Stillwater, OK

Land Owner: Oklahoma State University

Date Initiated: 2004

Plots: 14, 20m x 30m plots

Treatments: 

  • Control (no burn)
  • Burn January-February every 2 years
  • Burn March-April every 2 years
  • Burn May-June every 2 years
  • Burn July-August every 2 years
  • Burn September-October every 2 years
  • Burn November-December every 2 years 

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5. Fire Frequency in Post Oak-Blackjack Oak Forest            PICTURES

OSU Research Range

Location: Payne County, 6.5 miles west and .25 miles north of Stillwater, OK

Land Owner: Oklahoma State University

Date Initiated: 2007

Plots: 4- 13, 14, 15, 38 acres

Treatments:        

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6. Season of Burn in Sand Sagebrush Grassland                PICTURES

Hal & Fern Cooper Wildlife Management Area

Location: Woodward County, 3 miles south of Ft. Supply, OK

Land Owner: Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation

Date Initiated: 2005

Plots: 28, 60m x 60m plots

Treatments: 

  • Control (no burn)
  • Burn January-February every 2 years
  • Burn March-April every 2 years
  • Burn May-June every 2 years
  • Burn July-August every 2 years
  • Burn September-October every 2 years
  • Burn November-December every 2 years
  • Burn January-February every 4 years
  • Burn March-April every 4 years
  • Burn May-June every 4 years
  • Burn July-August every 4 years
  • Burn September-October every 4 years
  • Burn November-December every 24 years

Publications from area:

  • Vermeire, L.T., R.B. Mitchell, and S.D. Fuhlendorf. 2000. Sand sagebrush response to fall and spring prescribed burns. In: McArthur, E. Durant; Fairbanks, Daniel J., Proceedings: Shrubland Ecosystem Genetics and Biodiversity; 2000 June 13-15; Provo, UT. Proceedings: RMRS-P-000. Ogden, UT; Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station.
  • Vermeire, L.T. 2002. The fire ecology of sand sagebrush-mixed prairie in the southern Great Plains. Ph.D. thesis. Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock.

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Florida

Tall Timbers Research Station

 

 

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